Mission
Manpower
Methods
Money
Movement
Message
Might
Meetings
Maximization
Measurement

Manpower: People are selected and placed in positions that fit their gifts, passions and callings and that align with the church’s objectives and culture

Using Mentor-Coaching In Behavior Conversations

In Mentor-Coaching In A Supervisory Relationship we shared how a supervisor that incorporates both mentoring and coaching can more effectively support, develop and improve the performance of their direct reports.  A Mentor-Coaching approach is particularly effective in helping the supervisee gain insight and self-awareness into demonstrated behaviors, both positive and negative.

Mentor-Coaching Tips For Reinforcing Positive Behavior

Step 1: From your personal observation, work results and feedback shared from others, select one behavior to focus on that contributed to a successful ministry outcome, demonstrated a corporate value or modeled a biblical attribute.

Step 2: Citing specific examples, share in detail with the supervisee the positive behavior and its impact.

Step 3: Using powerful questions, ask the employee to identify potential sources of the positive behavior.

Step 4: Brainstorm with the supervisee about ways they can replicate the behavior in home, job and ministry circumstances.

Step 5: Continually watch for repeated demonstration of the positive behavior and look for opportunities to acknowledge and praise that behavior.

Mentor-Coaching Tips For Addressing Negative Behavior

Step 1: From your personal observation, work results and feedback shared from others, select one behavior to focus on that you consider to be negative or to have contributed to poor performance.

Step 2: Citing specific examples, share in detail with the supervisee the negative behavior and its impact and consequences.

Step 3: Listen carefully and be open to the supervisee’s perspective without judgment.

Step 4: Using powerful questions, ask the employee to identify potential sources of the negative behavior.

Step 5:  Brainstorm with the supervisee about ways they can do things differently in the future to achieve greater effectiveness and success.

Step 6: Describe the benefits of this new desired behavior and your confidence in the supervisee’s ability to demonstrate it.

Step 7: Involve the supervisee in identifying ways to further develop, master and apply this new desired behavior.

Step 8: If necessary, document these agreements in a development plan and set a date for follow up discussion.

Step 9: Continually watch for repeated demonstration of the new desired behavior and look for opportunities to acknowledge and praise that behavior.

 

 

 

 

 


Posted on March 28, 2017
Tags:


Jim Baker

Jim is a Church Organizational Leadership and Management Coach, Consultant and Trainer. Throughout his career Jim has demonstrated a passion for showing Pastors and Ministers how to use organizational tools for church and personal growth and health.

More About Jim

“For I may be absent in body, but I am with you in spirit, rejoicing to see how well ordered you are and the strength of your faith in Christ.” Colossians 2:5